15 Dog Breeds You’ll Want To Avoid At All Costs

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Getting a dog is one of the most rewarding and enjoyable experiences any family can have. They are generally great companions, loyal and lovable, and can be lots of laughs too with their silliness and funny antics! But hold your horses – choosing a particular dog breed for the next member of your family can be a bit tough, especially if you have babies or small children in your family. You need to take into consideration lots of factors, particularly the most important one – a dog breed that will get along well with your children, family, friends and neighbors! That being said, here are 15 dog breeds you’ll want to avoid at all costs!

15. Chihuahua

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For first time dog owners, this small breed can be a tough one to train. Many people mistake their smallness for the ease in handling and training them to get along well with family members, and boy were they mistaken! The small but terrible Chihuahua can get pretty aggressive especially when it comes to sharing attention! They are known for getting massively jealous with babies and small children, whenever they see your attention is on the baby and not on them! They are also strong-willed and very stubborn, so you’ll need to be very disciplined and firm in training them, or else you’ll soon see this small but terrible dog running your household instead of you!

14. Alaskan Malamute

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The Alaskan Malamute’s large size should be enough of an indicator that this breed is not advisable for families with small children.  The sheer size of this breed is potentially a danger for babies and toddlers, wherein they can get crushed underneath the heavy weight of the Alaskan Malamute even during innocent playtimes. This breed are brought up to survive the cold, harsh climate of Alaska, and are bred independently, so they are possibly hard to train, especially for first time dog owners. For members of the family who suffer from allergies and asthma, this breed is a terrible shedder, so definitely a no-no for your family!

13. Rottweiler

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We often see Rottweilers as police dogs and guard dogs, so right then you can tell that this is a dangerous breed to have as a family pet if you have no experience training dogs at all. While Rottweilers are loyal and courageous, they are also known to get aggressive in just a short amount of time. Their built-in aggressiveness can be a challenge to train especially for first-time owners, and their large size as they mature can be potential hazards for small members of the family. Rottweilers are a great breed and can be great additions to your family, they can guard your house and family, as long as you can heavily train them to not do harm to your house and your family.

12. Bullmastiff

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Bullmastiffs are another large and aggressive breed that is simply not advisable to get for a family with small children. This type of breed needs intense training with a firm and heavy hand, and it’s training should be continuous with no lapses starting from an early age, otherwise they can turn undisciplined and wreak havoc in your household. Their sheer size is also another factor why you should avoid them – they can easily knock down your toddler during playtime – all while being unaware of his size and mistake. Bullmastiffs are recommended to get as guard dogs and police dogs as they are even more aggressive than Rottweilers and other aggressive breeds, and definitely a no-no as the next member of your family!

11. Saint Bernard

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Generally known as a lovable and playful breed that’s suited to family life, Saint Bernards are “people” dogs and if you don’t mind their large size and slobbery nature, a Saint Bernard is a wonderful addition to your family. While growing to a huge size as they mature, Saint Bernards generally have a built-in understanding of small children. While they will treat little children gently, its sheer large size should be enough of a factor for those with small children in the family. Another con is that this breed is known for its short lifespan of around 8-10 years. Saint Bernards are also heavy shedders, so a definite no if you have allergy-sufferers in the family.

10. Weimaraner

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Originally bred to be hunting dogs, Wermaraners are known for being athletic, agile and strong dogs. One thing you should consider is that this breed has an endless supply of energy that needs to be expended every single day, so if you’re not one to stay in home or if you don’t have enough time, then this dog breed is not advisable for you. Weimaraners, since bred for hunting and the outdoors, don’t do well in confined spaces, so if you don’t have a large enough backyard for them to run around on, expect the inside of your house to be a wreck.

9.  Australian Shepherd

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The Australian Shepherd are originally bred to be working and herding dogs, so they too have an endless supply of energy to work off on a daily basis. Right off the bat, if you’re a busy person and don’t have lots of time to spend at home with this dog, ie. if you don’t have the time to exercise and socialize with this dog, the Australian Shepherd is not an advisable dog for you. This breed is also territorial, and can and sill display aggressiveness to those they view as strangers to their space, and this includes members of the family.

8.  Siberian Husky

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Siberian Huskies belong to the group of large dogs that can potentially be dangerous if you have babies and toddlers in your family. While a lovable dog, its sheer size can cause the dog to knock off your small kids during playtime without it being aware of its size. Another con for you to consider is that this dog breed also has a bottomless well of energy, and that they require daily walks, exercises and physical activities to expend that energy. So if you’re not one to spend all day at home, expect chaos and destruction in your household when you leave a Siberian Husky to its own devices.

7. Affenpinscher

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The Affenpinscher, also known as the Monkey Terrier, got its moniker because of its mischievous and playful nature. This toy terrier breed, while being playful and social, can be a good addition as your next four-legged member of the family, provided that it is trained well! Affenpinscher have the tendency to become disobedient if training is not consistent, and can get aggressive when being petted too effusively. Another con for you to consider is that this breed can be quite difficult to housebreak because of their mischievous and stubborn nature, and they require regular grooming to keep up their adorable appearance. More importantly, this toy terrier breed is fragile and prone to fractures due to mishandling and effusive playtimes and rough housing.

6. Chow Chow

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Chow Chows are a great dog breed to consider for your family, provided you are not a first time dog owner and already have the experience in taking care of dogs. This is because Chow Chows need a lot of time and care dedicated to them. They require a lot of socialization and training so as not to show their aggressiveness and their being territorial, and their training needs to be reinforced each and every day. Aside from that, Chow Chows are known to run into a lot of medical problems that are inherent to their breed, so if you’re not willing to spend time, attention, training and medical expenses for this breed, don’t get one.

5. Afghan Hound

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Known for their majestic looks and luxurious coats, Afghan Hounds are probably the most appealing dog breed when it comes to appearance. However, Afghan Hounds are typically bred for hunting and the owners, and this is a con for houses with confined spaces and not enough outdoor space for this dog to run around and expend its energy. An Afghan Hound is also quite a challenge to train in general, and you will definitely run into housebreaking problems if you’re a first time dog owner with this breed. Another con for you to consider is the time you’ll have to spend grooming the Afghan Hound to keep its luxurious coat.

4. The English Toy Spaniel

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One of the cutest dog breeds out there, the English Toy Spaniel can be a perfect addition to your family, if and only if they have proper training and if you have all the time in the world for them. This breed has a dependent personality so they need companionship for most of the day, or else they’ll develop separation anxiety. The English Toy Spaniel is also a shy and quiet type, so they can appear standoffish to friends and neighbors of the family who they don’t often see or spend time with.

3. Greyhound

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Originally bred for racing, the sleek and athletic Greyhound is not an ideal dog breed to get for your family, especially if you have small children, as their large size can easily knock down babies and toddlers. That being said, their large forms are not built for confined spaces of the home, so you better have a large enough backyard for this dog to run around on if you don’t want the inside of your home to become a disaster. Another con to think about is that Greyhounds shed – a lot! For allergy and asthma sufferers in your family, this breed is a definite no-no!

2. French Bulldog

The French Bulldog may seem like the most ideal dog breed that any family will be happy to have. Adorable, playful, and lovable, this dog breed is also hypo-allergenic, its minimal shedding will not trigger allergies or asthmas any family member might have. Minimal training and exercise if needed for the French Bulldog, the only negative factor you should consider is the time and attention you’ll need to spend and lavish upon this very demanding dog. French Bulldogs are known to turn into drama queens if you fall short in spending time with them, and they can get quite jealous if you turn your attention to your babies or small children!

1. Japanese Chin

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This dog breed is most notably known for being lap dogs or companion dogs of the English royalty, and also among Japanese nobility. Thus, having this unique heritage equally amounts to their spoiled temperaments! The Japanese Chin is known to turn jealous, aggressive and demanding when their needs are not met. While docile and very easy to train, the Japanese Chin is a heavy shedder and requires constant grooming, something to consider for allergic family members and if you wont have enough time to dedicate to caring for this dog. Not only that, Japanese Chin requires constant companionship to avoid separation anxiety, as they are prone to panic attacks when left alone!

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